Lehigh Township Residents Voice Opposition Against Wal-Mart Development

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Residents of Lehigh Township gathered Wednesday evening at a meeting of the township’s Planning Commission to learn more about the development of a Wal-Mart within the township—and to voice their criticism of the project.

The proposed Wal-Mart supercenter would be located at Route 145 and Birch Drive. The supercenter would also feature a gas station and a Wal-Mart convenience store.

Adam Benosky of Bohler Engineering attended the meeting on behalf of Wal-Mart to address any questions or concerns that residents had. Residents responded to Benosky’s plan with strong concerns that the project would negatively affect their community and quality of life.

Among the concerns were questions relating to crime, increased traffic and the store’s potential proximity to residential homes.

Lehigh Township resident Kate Popejoy questioned the crime levels associated with Wal-Mart stores. She asked, “How are you going to deal with the crime rate that happens with Wal-Mart? The crime rate is really not a pretty sight at most Wal-Marts.”

The commission said that next year’s budget will allow for the hiring two additional police officers, totaling 12 for the township, but the amount of police on duty at a given time will not increase, with two people on full-time according to the planning commission.

The addition of two officers to the police force did little to quell the unease in the room, as Popejoy referenced a Bloomberg news article which described a “tremendous load on police forces dealing with Wal-Marts.”

Some residents brought up the idea of the township intervening with Wal-Mart’s security, but Solicitor Michael Corriere said such actions are not within the township’s power.

“We can’t get involved with the internal security of Wal-Mart,” Corriere said. “In terms of the security, our officers will have to respond and handle it accordingly.”

Traffic is another concern that frightens Lehigh Township residents. Benosky could not provide specific numbers for the amount of tractor trailers that will enter and exit the property, but said he will inquire about an estimate and get back to the Planning Commission.

Vice Chair of the Planning Commission Cynthia Miller said she will do all in her power to restrict tractor trailers from using Birch Drive.

Residents seemed to have an overall negative reaction to the development, showing pessimism when discussing the future of the community.

“Why was this site chosen?” one resident asked. “We don’t need one.”

Residents argued that the construction and close proximity of the supercenter would prove disruptive for those who live nearby.

Alec Bodzin, a professor at Lehigh University and Lehigh Township resident, expressed that the Wal-Mart would require him and others to sell their homes. Bodzin said the Wal-Mart and the increased activity around it will cause property values to plummet, while providing an undesirable atmosphere for residents.

“I’m going to have to put my house of for sale,” he said. “When do I need to get a for sale sign in my yard?”

Regardless of the pleas of the community, it appears that there is little room for them to disrupt development. The land is zoned for commercial use and any client fitting the requirements of township ordinances will likely receive approval according to the Planning Commission.

“This is zoned commercial,” said Planning Commission Chairman David Shulman. “It could have been a supermarket, it could have been a strip mall, it could have been any number of uses that are permitted in our general commercial district. It just happened to be a Wal-Mart. We cannot change the zoning now that they submitted the plan for this site.”

Benosky, in an attempt to try and calm the concerns of residents, told attendees, “We’re trying to be cognizant of your concerns.”

After a resident asked to speak with Wal-Mart representatives directly, Benosky said that there is the possibility of getting Wal-Mart representatives to come answer specific questions which he could not provide answers to.

Numerous steps still need to be taken before the project is approved by the township, and it will ultimately be decided on by the Board of Supervisors before moving forward.

Mountain View Wesleyan Church Makes Mats For The Homeless

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Earlier this year, several women from their crochet club discussed making mats for the homeless out of plastic bags. Little did they know it would lead into a ministry of its own. Today they have a group that gets together every Tuesday morning from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the church to prepare the plastic bags for another group of crocheter’s, many who are a part of their crochet club that meets the fourth Tuesday of every month.

The process started with collecting bags, as each mat takes approximately 600 bags to complete. Next they started to prepare the bags- flatten, trim, cut, open, tie and roll into balls. When they soon realized the project was really in preparing the plarn (plastic yarn) and decided that we could involve others from the church in the project. So in July, they began meeting at the church every Tuesday morning to make the plarn. The ladies really enjoyed the time of fellowship and have now prepared enough plarn to complete ten mats (over 6,000 bags).

During the process we made contact with a few organizations that work with homeless people that we could donate the mats to. We quickly realized the need and for now, have no plans to stop making them.

It is with great honor that the first ten mats will be going to Franklin Homme, Commander of Disabled Veterans Lehigh Valley Chapter Seven (pictured below). Homme works for the Department of Veteran Affairs, helping vets get back on their feet.

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This project has gotten so many people involved, both inside and outside the church. They have several places that collect the bags for them. Lattemann’s Corner Store and Deli has a collection box as well with one of the mats on display. The Hair Hut in Walnutport has a young lady collecting bags for them as her service project. Several local stores allow them to collect from the recycled bag collection boxes as well.

Making the plarn has several steps and takes long to make, so recently another church, Bender’s Mennonite in Pen Argyl as gotten a group together to help make the plarn and plan to meet every other Monday from 12 until 3 p.m. at their church.

This project has branched out and become a blessing to so many and they haven’t even reached their intended destination yet. Perhaps the only thing better is they haven’t incurred any cost for this project. However, if the group continues to grow they may need to find a couple heavy-duty paper cutters.

As long as there is a need and the help is provided, the mats will continue to be made.

If anyone would like to help by collecting bags, prepping or crocheting a mat, call MVW Church at 610-759-7553 and leave a message for Gloria Koch.

Historic Northampton Street Fair Beat The Heat | 9/15

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by Justin Sweitzer

The historic Northampton Street Fair closed off Main Street on Saturday, September 10 for a day filled with food and festivities that brought many from the borough and beyond to the heart of Northampton.

The event was organized by the Northampton Area Chamber of Commerce and saw well over 60 vendors occupy the streets from 10 a.m. through 5 p.m.

There was something for everyone at the street fair, with homemade crafts and gifts available for collectors and shoppers alike, ranging from handmade glassware and custom crafted fishing rods to accessories for pets and accessories for the jewelry-lovers.

A basket raffle was also held with over 300 baskets up for grabs. They featured a variety of products including gift cards, kitchen supplies, sports-related products and other seasonal items.

Some groups used the opportunity to promote their causes and raise money, including area cub scout and girl scout troops, as well as the Lehigh Valley Tea Party.

Foodies had a variety of choices to pick from including slow-smoked barbecue, Rita’s Italian Ice and other food stands.

Children also joined in on the action, as many happily paraded through the street with painted faces and snow cone-stained-lips, showing their excitement despite the blistering heat that accompanied the fair.

The historic Roxy movie theatre opened its doors for self-guided tours, with access to scrapbooks and newspaper clippings retelling the theatre’s storied history since its inception. Owner Richard Wolfe was available for questions regarding the theatre, with many reliving and sharing stories from their youth with him.

A stroll backstage took fair-goers back to the dressing rooms previously occupied by some of entertainment’s biggest stars.

Not far outside the theatre doors was a stage featuring live music throughout the day, adding to the fulfillment of those in attendance.

Tony Pristash, president of the Northampton Area Chamber of Commerce, said the chamber was pleased with the sizeable crowd who came out in spite of the heat and humidity that joined them.

“We beat the heat,” Pristash said with a laugh, “We’re very happy for the crowd.”

Lehigh Township Residents Voice Opposition Against Wal-Mart Development

mc-walmart-plans-lehigh-township-store-20160511

by Justin Sweitzer

Residents of Lehigh Township gathered Wednesday evening at a meeting of the township’s Planning Commission to learn more about the development of a Wal-Mart within the township—and to voice their criticism of the project.

The proposed Wal-Mart supercenter would be located at Route 145 and Birch Drive. The supercenter would also feature a gas station and a Wal-Mart convenience store.

Adam Benosky of Bohler Engineering attended the meeting on behalf of Wal-Mart to address any questions or concerns that residents had. Residents responded to Benosky’s plan with strong concerns that the project would negatively affect their community and quality of life.

Among the concerns were questions relating to crime, increased traffic and the store’s potential proximity to residential homes.

Lehigh Township resident Kate Popejoy questioned the crime levels associated with Wal-Mart stores. She asked, “How are you going to deal with the crime rate that happens with Wal-Mart? The crime rate is really not a pretty sight at most Wal-Marts.”

The commission said that next year’s budget will allow for the hiring two additional police officers, totaling 12 for the township, but the amount of police on duty at a given time will not increase, with two people on full-time according to the planning commission.

The addition of two officers to the police force did little to quell the unease in the room, as Popejoy referenced a Bloomberg news article which described a “tremendous load on police forces dealing with Wal-Marts.”

Some residents brought up the idea of the township intervening with Wal-Mart’s security, but Solicitor Michael Corriere said such actions are not within the township’s power.

“We can’t get involved with the internal security of Wal-Mart,” Corriere said. “In terms of the security, our officers will have to respond and handle it accordingly.”

Traffic is another concern that frightens Lehigh Township residents. Benosky could not provide specific numbers for the amount of tractor trailers that will enter and exit the property, but said he will inquire about an estimate and get back to the Planning Commission.

Vice Chair of the Planning Commission Cynthia Miller said she will do all in her power to restrict tractor trailers from using Birch Drive.

Residents seemed to have an overall negative reaction to the development, showing pessimism when discussing the future of the community.

“Why was this site chosen?” one resident asked. “We don’t need one.”

Residents argued that the construction and close proximity of the supercenter would prove disruptive for those who live nearby.

Alec Bodzin, a professor at Lehigh University and Lehigh Township resident, expressed that the Wal-Mart would require him and others to sell their homes. Bodzin said the Wal-Mart and the increased activity around it will cause property values to plummet, while providing an undesirable atmosphere for residents.

“I’m going to have to put my house of for sale,” he said. “When do I need to get a for sale sign in my yard?”

Regardless of the pleas of the community, it appears that there is little room for them to disrupt development. The land is zoned for commercial use and any client fitting the requirements of township ordinances will likely receive approval according to the Planning Commission.

“This is zoned commercial,” said Planning Commission Chairman David Shulman. “It could have been a supermarket, it could have been a strip mall, it could have been any number of uses that are permitted in our general commercial district. It just happened to be a Wal-Mart. We cannot change the zoning now that they submitted the plan for this site.”

Benosky, in an attempt to try and calm the concerns of residents, told attendees, “We’re trying to be cognizant of your concerns.”

After a resident asked to speak with Wal-Mart representatives directly, Benosky said that there is the possibility of getting Wal-Mart representatives to come answer specific questions which he could not provide answers to.

Numerous steps still need to be taken before the project is approved by the township, and it will ultimately be decided on by the Board of Supervisors before moving forward.

How to Solve Termite Trouble

People who deal with various kinds of pests often argue which type are worst. Some claim that mosquitos make life unbearable, while others complain about that tiny ants interfere with their ability to prepare food in the kitchen. One thing you can’t argue with is dollars and cents. Termite infestations are an annoying as well as an expensive problem and can destroy hundreds and thousands of dollars in property. If you take pride in your home’s woodwork and custom-made cabinets and tables, a termite infestation is the last thing you want to see. Termites are not easy pests to tackle, so you need to find experts who can get the job done efficiently.

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How Termites Do So Much Damage
Termites seem to come out of nowhere and cause havoc. As with many small insects, there only need to be a few to result in hundreds or thousands in a short time. Like small ants, they are usually inside and outside the house and make their way from one place to the other. Termites burrow in the soil around your house and find the opportunity to get into your walls. What makes termites a more difficult problem than small ants is their voracious appetite and their ability to destroy wood. All termites do is eat and they can put away a massive amount of “food” the form of wood. If you have seen termites work on a log, you can just imagine the meal they will make of your interior woodwork.
Get Them Where They Live
The first step for keeping your home safe from pest is to determine where they are coming from and prevent them from reaching the places you don’t want them. You can apply all of the poison, but you will have to keep on doing it until you find out the source of the termites and get rid of them good, or at least keep them away. You may think you know where the termites are coming from only to find out that there must be another source. Consult a professional exterminator who is familiar with the habits of termites and can zero in on exactly where they are coming from, living and breeding.
Getting Rid of Them
Once the exterminator has found the source of the termites, he or she can begin killing the ones that are already there. Usually, a powerful material can be applied that will kill the termites and will keep them from returning for a certain period of time. Nowadays, exterminators try to avoid material that is heavily toxic, or if so, they concentrate the poison only in areas where it is needed. If you have pets or small children, you may want to consider clearing them out while the procedure is done. You can also find ecological pesticides that can remove the termites without creating toxic fumes in your home.
Do Not Delay
If you notice a termite infestation, do not delay in dealing with the problem immediately. They can cause significant, irreparable damage to your property and cherished items in your home, so protect your possessions and your family from these pests and consult an expert to prevent them from returning